Classroom Freebies

Color by Numbers - Order of Operations

This printable Holiday Turkey is perfect for the last few days before Thanksgiving. The color by numbers activity is aligned with the Common Core Standards (5.OA.1).
click image to go to freebie

Students solve each of the numerical expressions using order of operations. Then using the color code on the page, students color each sections of the turkey.

I have added a page for students to show their work and an answer key



Letter B and D masks Craftivity

These were so much fun to make with my kindergartners!!!  My students loved wearing their special masks to help them remember what a b,d,p,and q looked like.  I promise your students will love making and wearing these.  So much fun.  Head on over and grab them here.







Popsicle Number Recognition Fun


                                                                                                                                               
Oh wow is it hot outside but we are staying cool inside with this fun summer activity that refreshes our number recognition skills.  These popsicles are just enough fun for us to print out and add to our summer review skills.  You can head over and grab your very own set. 







I Have, Who Has? Place Value

I Have, Who Has? activities are a simple way to review a concept with your students. Traditionally the game is played with the whole class 

This game is aligned with the 5th grade Common Core (5.NBT.1)
 click image to go to freebie
Click image to go to freebie





Top 20 Summer Reading Titles!

What's on your summer reading list?


What do teachers read over summer break?

I took a poll of our awesome OC readers and here are the results!
  Teacher summer reading lists: You either typically read for pleasure or professional development titles to get a jump start on next school year. #summerreading #teacherbooklist Looks like the majority of our readers do tend to read both fiction and nonfiction throughout the summer break.

Great books for teachers to read over the summer will depend on your personality and your preferences - and the best part:  no one is judging you either way.  :)

Even the most effective teacher does not necessarily need to learn more about the achievement gap, how to write the nest lesson plan, or differentiating learning for every child during the school year.

My favorite comment from the survey results when I asked what you planned on reading over summer break?   "Trashy romance novels."   That truly made me giggle because even teachers need some time to shut down and recharge.

And trashy romance titles aren't exactly award-winning literature, so feel free to unplug and relax without analyzing the data or scrutinizing whether the capitals and punctuation is correct within the text.

A former professor in college (eons ago mind you) said something that stuck with me still to this day.  He mentioned how his wife, a very successful psychologist, would begin her weekend on Saturday morning by watching kids cartoons.  For several hours, she would be completely thoughtless about her high-stress clients and workweek past.  Instead she tuned in to some old school cartoons and just watched.  It was her way of decompressing so that she was able to truly be present with her family in her downtime.

Are you being present in your life over summer vacation?

With that said, I am personally a nonfiction book junkie.  I should probably start a support group.  Ha!

I LOVE reading about new ways to be better.  Personally, socially, emotionally, and even professionally.  Now, since we don't have a ton of "free time" throughout the school year, learning something that can help me to be a better educator is something I enjoy.

Even better?  It's on my terms and my topic choice.  No forced PD session here.

Typically, before the end of the school year, I choose something I would like to improve/implement in my classroom or instruction for the following school year.  Then, I pick up a handful of books related to that topic to peruse throughout the summer as I please.

One year, it was student led conferences.  Another was setting up better math centers.  Of course, early on I started with looking at multiple classroom management solutions to help me as I was starting out as a novice teacher. 

Need some good book suggestions for your summer reading list?

Here are 20 of the most popular suggestions from the OC readers.  Thanks so much to all who submitted their ideas!


Nonfiction Books for Teachers to Read Over the Summer




Fiction Books for Teachers to Read Over the Summer



  • Lilac Girls is another WWII era writing.  I think I see a theme from our readers.
  • Nora Roberts was mentioned and her #1 best seller is Shelter in Place.
  • How about David Baldacci for my mystery thriller readers?   True Blue has you covered.
  • Can you really get through a summer reading list for a female majority without mentioning at least something from Nicholas Sparks?  I don't think so.
  • Fish in a Tree

Many of the above titles can also be found at the local library if you are short on funds.  Or maybe you just love visiting your local library like I do.  It's always a great place to spend a stormy afternoon when the beach isn't an option.

Download and print off this super cute reading log to track books you would like to read, as well as those you have read.  Write in the titles on the spines of your "want" list.  Highlight them as you finish.

  Teacher summer reading lists: You either typically read for pleasure or professional development titles to get a jump start on next school year. #summerreading #teacherbooklist


 What else is on your reading list for this summer?  We would love to hear in the comments below! 

~Charity



This article originally appeared at Organized Classroom.

How Do You Schedule Your Day?

I was thinking about how teachers may not know about setting up a daily classroom schedule, so I will walk you through how to create and display yours!  #classroomschedule #printable 

We have had some discussions on the fan page lately about classroom schedules.   I started thinking about brand-new teachers and how they may not have a clue about setting up a schedule (if that liberty is given to them), so I will walk you through how I have always done my set up!  (PS - my way is not necessarily the "right" way, but it is my way which has always worked for me.)  :)

How Do you Set Up a Daily Classroom Schedule?

1.  First, I start with my start and ending times of the school day on a sheet of paper (or even on a handy printable - see below).

2.  Next, I fill in my specials times, lunch times, recess, and any other times (such as computer, speech, gifted resource, etc.) that may pertain to my class that year.  Those are usually not up to me but are rather handed down from above.

3.  From that point, I usually want to cry because I realize how little time I have to teach.  But, I digress - I go ahead and fill in my reading block first thing for in the morning (even if there is a break in between).  Depending on the district, it could be anywhere from 60-120 minutes, including writing and/or independent reading.

4.  After that, I try to find an uninterrupted block of 60 minutes (or as close to it as possible) for math.

5.  Last, I try to piece in 30-45 minutes for science OR social studies (I have always rotated every other week or 2 with one or the other rather than trying to teach 20 minutes of each).

6.  Finally, I make sure to include 10 minutes at the end of the day for packing things up as it always seems to get away from you if you aren't prepared.  And I make sure I have a 10-15 minute allotment somewhere in there for a read aloud - no matter what the grade level.  It could be after recess, at the end of the day after packing up (that does tend to get them to move faster btw), or I have even done it first thing in the morning if I had specials shortly after the announcements.

Where Do you Display Your New Visual Template?

One option is to create your own custom mini pocket chart.

I was thinking about how teachers may not know about setting up a daily classroom schedule, so I will walk you through how to create and display yours!  #classroomschedule #printable 

With this choice, you can display it on a central table - or even in the middle of a grouping of desks to save the dreaded "When are we done?" question constantly throughout the day.  

You could even choose to only display the current and next activity times for those students who struggle with the concept of how long something will last.

A second choice if your schedule seems to change on the daily due to specials, pull-outs, specialists, and other regular school events is to create a one-page printable for each day and place them on a pretty clipboard.

I was thinking about how teachers may not know about setting up a daily classroom schedule, so I will walk you through how to create and display yours!  #classroomschedule #printable 

 Hang the clipboard from a magnetic hook on the whiteboard or a removable hook attached to the wall that is in clear view of all students.

A third option is to display it right on a student desk.  Grab the freebie printable below and tape right on student desks in the corner if needed as a visual reminder for the minute by minute plan while at school.  

So there you have it - my version of how I tackle the dreaded daily schedule.  It really gets hairy if you are trying to coordinate team-teaching with other members of your grade level or if you are a gifted/special ed resource who needs to work with multiple teachers and grade levels (I still have nightmares about those conversations. LOL).

How about a fun freebie to at least make it look pretty?  :) I was thinking about teachers and how they may not know about setting up a schedule, so I will walk you through how I have always done mine! Stop by and see
Click Here for your Freebie


 Have fun scheduling!

~Charity


This post originally appeared at Organized Classroom.
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Free Fun for Memorial Day!

In honor of Memorial Day, I created a few activity pages for the kids to do on Monday in observance of the holiday. Enjoy and please be sure to remember!  #memorialday #remembrance

Interesting Trivia About Memorial Day:

Memorial Day is always the last Monday in May.

Memorial Day pays tribute to those who have died during military service.  It is sometimes confused with honoring those who have served in the military.  That is actually Veterans Day.

At 3 pm on Memorial Day, there is a moment of silence across the country.

Some other ideas:

  • Stop at a local nursing home or veteran facility and have kids play a game with some of the war veterans.  A quick conversation while playing Checkers or Bingo could really brighten a day for an honorable someone.
  • Have kids record a video recording thanking the troops for our freedoms.  Upload it and email to an overseas unit.
  • Go on a mini-field trip in your hometown.  Look for things to take photos of that describe the following vocab words:  honor, memorial, Old Glory, freedom, patriotic
Below are also some great book links you might also want to check out (keep in mind that Flag Day will also soon be upon us).

The Wall by Eve Bunting

F is For Flag by Wendy Cheyette Lewison

America’s White Table by Margot Theis Raven

In honor of Memorial Day, I created a few activity pages for the kids to do on Monday in observance of the holiday.  Please enjoy the day and remember to reflect upon the meaning. In honor of Memorial Day, I created a few activity pages for the kids to do on Monday in observance of the holiday. Enjoy and please be sure to remember!  #memorialday #remembrance
Click Here for your Freebie  


Have a great holiday everyone and make sure to appreciate all those who have made our freedoms a reality!

 ~Charity

Charity Preston, M.A. This article originally appeared at Organized Classroom.